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Ancient Winery Discovered In Nile Delta!

Ancient Winery Discovered In Nile Delta!

blog , Laurita Journal , News , wine news 🕔January 29, 2019 0 comments

According to the Ministry of Antiquities for the Arab Republic of Egypt (MOA), archeologists have discovered storage rooms in an ancient winery! Talk about old school!

The two thousand year old winery had been discovered during previous excavations, but the newest dig showed some interesting finds, according to LiveScience.


Credit: Ministry of Antiquities, Arab Republic of Egypt


The winery was built in what is now the Beheira governorate on Egypt’s northern coast, during the Greco-Roman era — which lasted from the fourth century B.C. to the seventh century A.D., the Associated Press reported.

The Ministry of Antiquities made an announcement about the dig on their Facebook page.


Dr. Mostafa Waziri General Secretary of the Supreme Council of Antiquities announces and explains that the storage galleries have a very distinguished architectural style as it was built with thick mud brick walls with different sizes and inside it was inserted irregular shaped lime stone blocks.
Dr. Waziri suggests that these blocks could be inserted to control the suitable temperature to store the wine.

They found pottery and kilns dating back to the Ptolemaic era, “with coins dated back to king Ptolemy I reigns and the Roman emperor Dumitianus and the Islamic era”.

If you never thought of the Nile as wine country, you might want to think again.

Dr. Ayman Ashmawy Head of the Ancient Antiquities said that the area was well known with its high quality kind of wine as it was considered as the finest wine during the Greco- Roman time.

We wonder whether there was anything left in that pottery to taste. You know… for scientific purposes and all. Who wouldn’t want to try the finest wine of Greco-Roman time – or any other?

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